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Chumby developer building open source laptop

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Hardware

Andrew 'bunnie' Huang has announced he is planning to build a DIY laptop from openly documented hardware in an effort currently codenamed "Novena". Open hardware means that there are no licensing fees for circuit diagrams and specifications. Whilst the open source movement has been well established in the software field for some years, open hardware is still something of a rarity in the PC component field. The project plans to make a system that works with both open source hardware and software.

Huang made his name as one of the first Xbox hackers and the developer of Chumby. Huang wants to make it possible for other enthusiasts to build and modify his laptop design, to which end he and his team have manufactured a motherboard using only hardware with open source specifications and drivers.

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