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First Firefox builds with H.264 support appear (really)

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Moz/FF

Back in November I ran a story that Mozilla added support for H.264 video to Firefox Nightly versions. Turned out that this was not the case after all, but a case of the NoScript plugin blocking the detection on YouTube’s HTML5 player site.

It has been a month since that unfortunate news piece, and things seem to have taken a turn for the better, finally. A test build of Firefox 20 with H.264 support has been created for Windows versions of the web browser. The Nightly test version adds a WMF decoder and reader to the Firefox browser that interfaces with Windows Media Foundation to add H.264, AAC and MP3 playback capabilities to the Firefox web browser.

rest here




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