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My Desktop Dreams

more touchscreen control
30% (282 votes)
more effects and widgets
3% (30 votes)
more simplicity
15% (144 votes)
more traditional
16% (151 votes)
more configuration
18% (171 votes)
more integrated apps
4% (42 votes)
just a window manager
8% (72 votes)
commandline only
2% (18 votes)
other
5% (45 votes)
Total votes: 955

I just want .....

I just f'ing want something that doesn't look like a f'ing tablet or a smart phone. It's a desktop ffs!

Openbox works well for my needs

Back in the days of Gnome 2.32, I was a happy Gnome user. When Unity and Gnome 3 happened, I turned into a "desktop drifter" of sorts with no permanent home. Upon discovering Xubuntu and Xfce, I was happy... but only for a short while; soon after installing Xubuntu I discovered the world of minimally-designed and lightweight window managers, and fell in love. I am now a happy user of CrunchBang Linux Waldorf (based on Debian Wheezy/testing) with Openbox.

I do care about the desktop if it gets in my way

I think some of the options are rather silly and obscure the underlying issues. Still, if one groups them like this ...

more touchscreen control 10 votes
more effects and widgets 4 votes
more configuration 53 votes
more integrated apps 20 votes
----------
MORE BLING 87 votes

more simplicity 51 votes
more traditional 64 votes
just a window manager 32 votes
commandline only 4 votes
----------
LESS BLING 151 votes

other 10 votes

... it becomes obvious that a majority of voters prefer more simple and functional desktop environments over the infantile and distracting toy shops that KDE, Gnome and Unity are today. When one also considers the "more configuration" option to be a given for any user, there's actually a rather large majority for sane, sober, secular, rational and enlightened desktop environments.

(Sample taken Tue Dec 11 21:00:00 CET 2012)

I don't care about the desktop as long it does not stand in my w

way ...

What blocks Linux or FOSS is not features in the Desktop. The desktop in just a box,
a nice wrap around the applications.

Applications in Linux really suck compared to their windows counter parts sometimes.
Compare the amount of PDF readers who can do annotations in Windows and Linux.

People are trapped in windows to MS OFFICE, and sometimes the only way to move them,
is to offer a better alternative.

Although I use Linux and FreeBSD, I am really pissed off sometimes about the quality of
applications .

Oz

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 389: Best Practices Badge
  • OpenGL 4.5 For The Intel Mesa Driver May Be Imminent
    Intel has been rapidly advancing their OpenGL 4.x support and OpenGL 4.5 is even in sight now. Kristian Høgsberg today landed GL_KHR_robustness support in the i965 DRI driver, a requirement for OpenGL 4.5.
  • Shotwell vs. digiKam
    How to manage your photos? – That is probably the biggest question for anyone doing anything with a photo camera. As resolutions of cameras grow, the data we have to manage is growing ever. In my case I am talking about more than 50000 photos and videos measuring up to about 200Gb of disk space, constantly growing. There are several photo management softwares out there, I guess the most commonly used ones are Shotwell for the Gnome desktop, digiKam for the KDE world, and FotoXX. I have not used Shotwell and digiKam for quite some time, and collect here my experiences of strength and weaknesses of the two programs. FotoXX seems to be very powerful, too, but I haven’t tested it till now.
  • Tweet your database with db2twitter
    db2twitter is developed by and run for LinuxJobs.fr, the job board of th french-speaking Free Software and Opensource community.
  • Tiny Core Linux 7.1 Screenshot Tour
  • Annoying myths about Linux that won't go away
    Linux has been around for many years, and has gotten better and better as time has gone by. Yet there are some enduring, inaccurate, and annoying myths about Linux that persist to this day. A Linux redditor started a thread about Linux myths and got some interesting responses from his fellow Linux users:
  • GStreamer Spring Hackfest 2016
    After missing the last few GStreamer hackfests I finally managed to attend this time. It was held in Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest city. The city is located by the sea side and the entire hackfest and related activities were either directly by the sea or just a couple blocks away.
  • My talk at OSDC 2016: Continuous Integration in Data Centers – Further 3 Years Later
  • Isenkram with PackageKit support - new version 0.23 available in Debian unstable
    The isenkram system is a user-focused solution in Debian for handling hardware related packages. The idea is to have a database of mappings between hardware and packages, and pop up a dialog suggesting for the user to install the packages to use a given hardware dongle. Some use cases are when you insert a Yubikey, it proposes to install the software needed to control it; when you insert a braille reader list it proposes to install the packages needed to send text to the reader; and when you insert a ColorHug screen calibrator it suggests to install the driver for it. The system work well, and even have a few command line tools to install firmware packages and packages for the hardware already in the machine (as opposed to hotpluggable hardware).

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: KDE (Akonadi, KWin)

  • Akonadi for e-mail needs to die
    So, I'm officially giving up on kmail2 (i.e., the Akonadi-based version of kmail) on the last one of my PCs now. I have tried hard and put in a lot of effort to get it working, but it costs me a significant amount of time and effort just to be able to receive and read e-mail - meaning hanging IMAP resources every few minutes, the feared "Multiple merge candidates" bug popping up again and again, and other surprise events. That is plainly not acceptable in the workplace, where I need to rely on e-mail as means of communication. By leaving kmail2 I seem to be following many many other people... Even dedicated KDE enthusiasts that I know have by now migrated to Trojita or Thunderbird.
  • Virtual keyboard support in KWin/Wayland 5.7
    Over the last weeks I worked on improved input device support in KWin/Wayland and support for virtual keyboard. KWin 5.7 will integrate the new QtVirtualKeyboard module which is now available under GPLv3. For us this means that we have access to a high quality QML based keyboard. For Qt it means that the virtual keyboard is exposed to more users and thanks to the open source nature it means that we can upstream fixes.
  • Virtual Keyboard Support For KWin / KDE Wayland 5.7
    The latest KWin/Wayland hacking project by Martin Gräßlin is adding virtual keyboard support to KWin for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.7 release. This virtual keyboard support is powered by the QtVirtualKeyboard module and provides a high-quality, QML-based keyboard that will work on KWin/Wayland when no hardware keyboard is available. Implementing this virtual keyboard support with Wayland compatibility was actually quite a feat, but has now become a reality thanks to the work by Martin.