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HP Pavilion dm1-4310: SSD installation, and fun with EFI Boot

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

I purchased this new laptop because it was what I wanted, and I had been watching for it for quite a while. I didn't want just any random laptop, or just whatever some OEM was willing to sell me without an operating system loaded. I wanted this particular one.

So, now I have had this lovely new HP sub-notebook for a few days, and I have loaded and reloaded various Linux distributions on it a lot of times. One thing that impressed me about it was how fast it is, for this kind of system. It boots, runs, suspeds, wakes up and shuts down amazingly quickly. The hardware seems very solid too (did I mention that it doesn't have the accursed Synaptic ClickPad?), and although the Wi-Fi adapter is currently ahead of most Linux distributions, that won't last long. So I was starting to become pretty sure that this would turn out to be my new preferred notebook system. That gave me the idea of extracting the Samsung SSD from my Acer Aspire One 522 (AO 522), and putting it in this HP Pavilion to see how that goes.

rest here




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