Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Valve's Steam License Causes Linux Packaging Concerns

Filed under
Gaming

With catering to Ubuntu Linux users as their first priority, Valve released the Linux beta as just a Debian package. Other Linux distribution packagers meanwhile want Steam on their own Linux distribution and to make it easy for their Linux gamers, so some have begun creating their own Steam binary packages. One of the first Linux distributions doing this was Arch Linux where they re-packaged Steam for Linux for their system. However, concerns have arose whether this is permitted or not.

There's a new Arch Linux mailing list thread about Steam in their repository. An Arch Linux developer is concerned about the re-packaged Steam Linux binary being there without the explicit consent of Valve. "I just noticed that steam was put into the multilib repo. It's unfortunate that such questionable packages are brought into our repos without any discussion (similar case are the catalyst drivers). My concern is it's license here. We modify and redistribute steam here which is probably not allowed according to 1.B of steam's license. So unless I am wrong here or there is a written permission from Valve please remove this package asap."

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Linux and Graphics

Security News

  • Hacking the American College Application Process
    In recent years, foreign students have streamed into American universities, their numbers nearly doubling in the last decade. About half of all international students are coming from Asian countries, many of which have been subject to heavy recruitment from American colleges. Taking advantage of the popularity of an American education, a new industry has sprung up in East Asia, focused on guiding students through the U.S. college application process with SAT preparation courses, English tutors and college essay advisors. But not all college prep companies are playing by the rules. In their investigative series for Reuters, a team of reporters found that foreign companies are increasingly helping students game the U.S. college application process. Some companies have leaked questions from college entrance exams to their students before they take the test. Others have gone so far as to ghostwrite entire college applications and complete coursework for students when they arrive on campus. We spoke with Steve Stecklow, one of the reporters on the team, about what they uncovered.
  • illusive networks' Deceptions Everywhere
    illusive networks' bread and butter is its deception cybersecurity technology called Deceptions Everywhere whose approach is to neutralize targeted attacks and Advanced Persistent Threats by creating a deceptive layer across the entire network. By providing an endless source of false information, illusive networks disrupts and detects attacks with real-time forensics and without disruption to business.
  • Mozila Offers Free Security Scanning Service: Observatory
    With an eye toward helpiing administrators protect their websites and user communities, Mozilla has developed an online scanner that can check if web servers have optimal security settings in place. It's called Observatory and was initially built for in-house use, but it may very well be a difference maker for you. "Observatory by Mozilla is a project designed to help developers, system administrators, and security professionals configure their sites safely and securely," the company reports.

Games for GNU/Linux

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Flatpak Universal Linux Package Supports Local Path References for Git Sources
    Alex Larsson from the Flatpak project has announced the release of a new maintenance update to the universal binary package format for Linux kernel-based operating systems. Flatpak 0.6.9 is now the latest version, and it promises to add many great enhancements, among which we can mention the ability to pass partial references every time a terminal command takes a runtime or application name, as well as a brand new command called build-commit-from. Application developers who want to package their apps and distribute it in the Flatpak format can use the above-mentioned command for creating new commits based on the contents of an existing commit, which can be from another local repository or a remote one.
  • Multiple vulnerabilities in RPM – and a rant
    Last year in November I decided that it might be a good idea to fuzz the parsers of package management tools in Linux distributions. I quickly found a couple of issues in DPKG and RPM. For DPKG the process went very smooth. I reported them to Debian's security team, eight days later fixes and security advisories were published by both Debian and Ubuntu, the main distributions using DPKG. For RPM the process was a bit more difficult.
  • Commvault announces support for Red Hat Virtualisation 4
    Back-up and archive specialist CommVault has announced support for Red Hat Virtualisation 4, the open source company's kernel-based virtual machine powered virtualisation platform. Red Hat Virtualisation 4 is built on the company's enterprise Linux distribution. It provides a centralised management platform for both Linux- and Windows-based workloads.
  • Zacks Assigns Rating To Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • GSoC Wrap Up
    GSoC 2016 finished last week and i am writing this blog to list the work done by me in last three months for Fedora. My project was to adjust pagure and write script(s) so that we can have pkgs.fedoraproject.org on a pagure instance.