Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Windows 8 vs Ubuntu: battle of the operating systems

Filed under

When Windows 8 is released on 26 October, it will be the third straight time a major Windows version is launched close to the release of arguably the world's most popular Linux distro - Ubuntu.

Ubuntu and Canonical have come a long way since their 7.04 Feisty Fawn release, which followed Microsoft's Windows Vista.

Back then, Canonical failed to capitalise on Vista's universal rejection by its users. If reviews of the Windows 8 Consumer Preview are any indication, it'll be a very cold winter for Microsoft.

But, more importantly for the Linux community, does Ubuntu 12.04 have what it takes to position itself as a more usable alternative?

Rest here

Windows 8 vs Ubuntu

It has long been said that you cannot polish a turd, but after years of trying it has apparently happened not once but twice. Take your pick from a pair of pretty TURDS.

Thank god for KDE

Thank god for KDE - its going to be the only real modern 'desktop' left on any OS soon.

It means I can actually do some work (impossible with unity/gnome3/windows8) and play games at full speed (not possible in unity)

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Chrome Remote Desktop is used on Deepin 15 for remote assistance

If you’ve installed the latest pre-stable edition of Deepin 15 (Deepin 2015), which I just wrote about earlier today (see Deepin 15. This could be the best Linux desktop distribution of the year), a module you’ll find in the Control Center, is Remote Assistance. Read more

Itty bitty ARM module starts at $27

Variscite’s rugged, 50 x 25mm “DART-6UL” COM runs Linux on an i.MX6 UltraLite SoC, offers NAND, eMMC, and wireless, and starts at $27 in volume. In April, Variscite announced the world’s smallest i.MX6 computer-on-module with its 50 x 20mm, Freescale i.MX6-based DART-MX6. At 50 x 25mm, the DART-6UL doesn’t quite match those dimensions, but it offers greater power efficiency, making it well suited for IoT applications and battery-powered devices. Variscite claims it consumes only 5mA in suspend mode. Read more