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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 477

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 41st issue of DistroWatch Weekly! Taking a break from the usual distro reviews, this week's feature story is a hardware adventure that explores the ARM-based ODROID-X development platform. Robert Storey has spent a few weeks turning a complex-looking device into a useful computer system and is happy to share his experiences. With the growing number of ARM-based boards available for purchase on the Internet, this is an area where any Linux geek will be only too happy to explore for fun and profit.

In the news section, Ubuntu's Amazon controversy continues despite the project's new option to turn off the Amazon search feature, OpenBSD takes a stab at Linux for having a damaging effect on the POSIX standards system, and openSUSE's new board chairman Vincent Untz defends GNOME 3 from the continued criticism in the media. Also in this issue, an article about installing Debian GNU/Linux on Raspberry Pi, a story of Tiny Core Linux serving as a single-purpose virtual appliance, and an opinion piece calling for the creation of a "Linux operating system" with a common base shared across the many distributions.

Happy reading!




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