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A Linux user switches to DOS

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Every now and then a new piece of hardware, or software, is released that causes me to pause and think, "Why, on Earth, do we update our tech so often? What, exactly, can I do with the latest stuff that wasn’t possible with the previous version?"

A good example would be the iPhone 5 and iOS 6. What do we really get if we upgrade to the latest kit from Apple (other than a broken Maps app)? Ok, so you get a mildly improved camera, but, other than that, it looks pretty much the same as what was available the year before. And the year before that. So, in most cases, upgrading seems a tad...silly. (Note: Apple apologists and fans, please don't take offense...pretty much every phone and operating system maker on the planet could be used in that example.)

But what if we take this to a bit of an extreme? What if someone like me - who lives in a modern Linux Desktop all day - makes a big switch and starts using some older tech? Even just for a week.

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