Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 475

Filed under

Welcome to this year's 39th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! PCLinuxOS has long been a favourite distribution among users seeking a familiar desktop environment and out-of-the box support for popular hardware, media formats and browser plugins. Recently the project founder's health issues have slowed down the development of the distro, but the community seems strong enough to carry on in the absence of their great leader. Jesse Smith takes a look at latest of the quarterly PCLinuxOS updates and the project's KDE desktop implementation in this week's feature story. In the news section, Ubuntu integrates Amazon shopping with the Unity desktop amid renewed scepticism of its users, openSUSE project leader Andreas Jaeger revels in the increasing community involvement that helps building the popular distribution, and SolusOS founder Ikey Doherty explains the upcoming switch from Debian's package management format to Pardus' PiSi. Also in this issue, a quick look at ownCloud, one of the growing numbers of online storage services providing universal file access through a web-based interface. All this and more, including the usual sections, in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly. Happy reading!

Read Here

More in Tux Machines

Turris Omnia Is a Linux-Based Powerful Open Source Router That Updates on the Fly

Turris Omnia is a new open source router that comes with powerful hardware and a Linux distro based on OpenWRT. It’s a smashing hit on Indiegogo, and there is still time to get one. Read more

APT (Advanced Package Tool) 1.1 Is Now Stable in Debian

APT (Advanced Package Tool) is a famous set of core tools inside Debian that make it possible to install, remove, and keep applications up to date. The stable branch of APT has been finally upgraded with the version 1.3. Read more

Historians and detectives keep track of data with open source tool

Segrada is a piece of open source software that allows historians (and detectives) to keep track of their data. Unlike wikis or archival databases, its focus lies on information and interrelations within it. Pieces of information might represent persons, places, things, or concepts. These "nodes" can be bidirectionally connected with each other to semantically represent friendship, blood relation, whereabouts, authorship, and so on. Hence the term "semantic graph database," since information can be displayed as a graph of semantically connected nodes. Read more

today's leftovers