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PCLinuxOS KDE 2012.08 Review: Better than ever!

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I became a big fan of PCLinuxOS since February this year. First time, I used PCLinux (I am still a Linux n00b) when I downloaded the Feb'12 release and installed it in one of the systems I have. I am not a KDE fan but PCLinuxOS is different! I have used Ubuntu mostly in last 2 year or so and I could never successfully update Ubuntu - I had to do fresh install every time! PCLinuxOS is actually the first Linux OS which I could upgrade without breaking anything. Also, there's a knowledgeable and helpful forum in place to help you out of issues like screen not displaying proper resolution and stuff like that!

The appearance hasn't changed significantly from the last edition with minor facelifts here and there. Overall, there's no drastic change to shock the users. Linux kernel is updated to and KDE is 4.8.3. I guess you can install KDE 4.8.5 or 4.9 (final version to be released) in PCLinuxOS as well. NVIDIA and ATI support is out-of-the-box and it works well with common graphic cards.

rest here

Don't do it!!!

This is a very common newbie mistake (I did it too.) Don't go installing the latest greatest anything, including KDE desktop unless or until it's in the PCLOS repository.

The reason for the exceptional "out of the box" experience is that the packagers have spent many, many hours fine tuning all the apps to work properly with each other. PCLinuxOS is all about having a distro that "just works." Not one that has the latest versions of software.

If there is a package that you want that's not in the repo, request it be added. If it can be included without causing issues, it will be, although it will be the stable version, not necessarily the newest.

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