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The truth about Goobuntu: Google's in-house desktop Ubuntu Linux

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Ubuntu

Most Linux people know that Google uses Linux on its desktops as well as its servers. Some know that Ubuntu Linux is Google's desktop of choice and that it's called Goobuntu. But almost no one outside of Google knew exactly what was in it or what roles Ubuntu Linux plays on Google's campus, until now.

Today, August 29th , Thomas Bushnell, the tech lead of the group that manages and distributes Linux to Google's corporate desktops unveiled Goobuntu from behind Google's curtain at LinuxCon, the Linux Foundation's annual North American technical conference, First things first, can you download Goobuntu to run it yourself? Well yes and no.

Bushnell explained that “Goobuntu is simply a light skin over standard Ubuntu.”

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