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Ogg Vorbis: Music to your ears

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Interviews

The MP3 format is rife with potential licensing issues due. There are, however, alternatives that eliminate legal worries, including open source resources like Ogg Vorbis and music players like Rhythmbox, says Kyle Rankin, author of Linux Multimedia Hacks from O'Reilly Media, Inc.

In this interview, Rankin explains why he prefers open source Amarok and thinks Ogg Vorbis sounds better than MP3s. He also describes a handy audio hack.

What advantages do you see to choosing Rhythmbox over iTunes or Windows Media Player?

Kyle Rankin: I would say the primary advantage in choosing Rhythmbox would be a licensing advantage simply because Rhythmbox is open source software. As far as feature sets go, Rhythmbox does not really offer anything compelling over the other two.

That having been said, the Amarok music player really does offer a number of features and integration such as the ability to log listening data into a centralized database over the network, audioscrobbler (last.fm) support, a lyrics search and a variety of different features that all leverage a number of the music services currently available on the Internet.

What is your favorite hack out of Chapter 2, the audio section of your book?

Full Story.

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