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Review: Linux Mint 13 LTS "Maya" KDE

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Linux

About a week ago, I reviewed the Xfce edition of Linux Mint 13 LTS "Maya". While I was quite pleased with how that turned out, I held off on going ahead and installing it because I wanted to try the KDE edition as well.

I tried the 64-bit edition as a live USB system made with UnetBootin. Follow the jump to see if it could be worthy of installation on the hard drive of my laptop.

After getting past the boot menu, I was greeted by a blank screen for the boot splash, as has become normal for Linux Mint. After that came the desktop, which has outwardly changed so little since Linux Mint 12 "Lisa" KDE that I won't go over that again; the only change is that the icon theme is the old Oxygen icon set rather than the current one, which makes for an interesting study in contrasts, but now I actually prefer the current Oxygen icon theme more.

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