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Banned Diablo 3 Linux Users Speak Out: We Are Not Cheaters

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Linux
Gaming

There's a lot of drama right now over the Linux users being banned in Diablo III. A small portion of the Linux Wine community have come forward to say that they have been banned. This happened across a few Linux sites as well as the Diablo III forums. Blizzard's lead community manager, Bashiok, came forward saying that all the bans were legit and the only people being banned were cheaters.

After Bashiok's comments went live the pitchforks went away and the torches were put out. Obviously, the banned victims were liars and cheaters because Bashiok said so. Well, a few of the banned Linux members have come forward to dispute the claims and they say that they are not cheaters.

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