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$10,000 for Moore's Law Mag

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Hardware

Electronics giant Intel have posted a request on E-bay spin-off 'Want it Now' for a copy of the April 19, 1965 issue of Electronics Magazine, offering $10,000 for a mint edition.

The reason for the large reward is that Intel co-founder Gordon Moore had his theory, which became known as Moore's Law, published in that edition of the magazine.

The 'law' came about from the article where Moore observed an exponential growth in the number of transistors per integrated circuit and predicted that this trend would continue. The 'law' has held true so far and Intel themselves predict it will do so until the end of the decade.

On their advert Intel goes on to warn people not to pilfer copies from libraries and to take good photos.

The company will choose the best one offered or buy several at a lower price.

We imagine hoarders and engineers all over California are currently digging through boxes of junk hidden away in lofts and garages.

If you have a copy, assuming the advert is genuine (ding, ding-ding ding...) then you can submit a reply to the request on Want it Now.

The Ad.

Source.

theregister is nuts

theregister is carrying a humorous look at this story. I got quite the chuckle out of it: clicky.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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