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Fedora 17 LXDE Review:

Filed under
Linux

Fedora 15's stability and usability didn't disappoint when I ran it through its paces last year. What convinced me not to keep Lovelock 15 was Gnome 3, which crippled my productivity to no end. After the somewhat lackluster Ubuntu 12.04 Unity LTS, I was looking forward to Fedora 17 on an LXDE desktop.

Bottomline

Unless you have plenty of time and prefer to set up your OS from scratch like the many ArchLinux fans out there (including me), Fedora 17 Beefy Miracle LXDE is an excellent canvas to build your fast and efficient Linux system. Fedora 17 LXDE is slim with very minimal applications - perfect for those users who prefer to select their own utilities and productivity applications without having to uninstall the included applications.

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