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Mandriva has become a joke

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MDV

After months of prevarication, and announcements that sounded as though they were emanating from a publication like Pravda, the company now says it will turn over development of the distribution to the community.

The man who made the announcement, chief executive Jean-Manuel Croset, appears to have a poor memory. The horse bolted some time ago - a goodly portion of the development community, fed up with the company's dithering, forked the distribution in 2010 and created the Mageia GNU/Linux distribution.

Now, Croset, after another of his meaningless announcements, each of which is just a series of words strung together providing next to no real information, apparently wants to split the community into two - one developing Mandriva, the other Mageia.

Rest here




Mandriva's demise

According to Distrowatch's hit rankings (for the last 3 months), Mageia has climbed to #4, just behind #3 Fedora, and just ahead of #5 Debian and #6 OpenSUSE. (Yes, as many have often noted, the Distrowatch hit rankings are certainly not a scientific measure of a distro's usage).

Mandriva has sunk to #33. I switched my main machine from Mandriva to Mageia when Mageia first came out--and I don't plan on looking back.

news websites.

Someone should shut down 99% of these so called tech news websites and put their idiotic authors in jail.

Mandriva has always been a

Mandriva has always been a joke. Mandrake was cool.

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