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Crucial Gizmo!

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Hardware
Reviews

Introduction

The USB Flash drive technology is becoming more popular as each day passes. Since flash drive technology is progressing at a rapid rate and newer drives are faster, larger and more affordable, many users find them as an easy way out from the restraints of the old, very limited capacity and slow floppy disk drives and the single write capability of the optical disks. Flash disks are progressing because of their high speed and ease of use, they are similar to small hard disk drives that fit into your pocket and you can simply and quickly utilize by placing them into an USB slot. Crucial took a step forward with their Gizmo! Flash drive design, releasing the 3rd version of their USB Flash drive several weeks ago, claiming it to be smaller and faster than previous models. Let us put the new Flash drive to the test and see what the little Gizmo drive can really do.

Conclusion

The Gizmo! drive is far more versatile than the common storage methods and solutions from the old days. With the new smaller format and even lower price, it rightfully demands a place in your pocket. You can write to it and erase it as many times as you like, like a floppy disk, while it is as large as a CD and very fast compared to either media. It is tiny so you can always carry it around with you. The Gizmo! does not have moving parts, it is completely silent and highly reliable. Its capabilities are not reduced o­nly to storage. Since USB drive technology is maturing, most motherboard support booting from USB devices already o­n their newest boards. You can easily turn your Gizmo! into a restoration and bootable disk if you wish. Many Linux distributions even are made to fit into flash disk drives, so you can install a Linux distribution in your Gizmo! to make it a complete bootable OS. The capabilities are limited o­nly by your imagination. All I can do for my part is to give the Gizmo! our Xtreme Value award, since it is o­ne of the least expensive USB Flash drives currently available while it is very fast and features a lifetime warranty.

Full Review with benchmarks and pics.

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