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Slitaz 4.0 Arrives with New TazPanel Goodness

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Linux

Slitaz seems to be growing up and playing with the big boys. In the latest release, new original tools highlight the maturing nature of this tiny distro. It's been two years in the making, but it's been worth the wait.

LXDE and OpenBox are used to provide a familiar and pretty desktop interface. The simple layout soon leads the user to discover TazPanel. TazPanel is the new Slitaz administration and setting center. It's a Web browser connected internally to a server running on port 82. The information and configuration tools are written in XHTLM and CSS and feel oddly familiar. From TazPanel one can do things like configure their network, add or remove users, and install Slitaz onto hard drive, optical disk, or USB stick.

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