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Microsoft Settles to Gateway $150 Million

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Microsoft
Legal

Microsoft Corp., the world's biggest software maker, agreed to pay personal-computer company Gateway Inc. $150 million over four years to resolve antitrust claims.

The settlement comes after mediation that followed a U.S. government antitrust suit against Microsoft, the companies said today in a statement. Gateway sued because U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson said during that case that Microsoft's dominance had hurt Gateway.

Resolving Gateway's charges helps Redmond, Washington-based Microsoft wrap up legal cases and focus on product development as sales are expected to post their slowest growth ever this year. Microsoft last month agreed to pay $60 million to Burst.com Inc. to settle a patent-infringement lawsuit and last year paid $1.6 billion to end a 10-year fight with Sun Microsystems Inc.

That full story here.


Annnd:

Microsoft Corp. has filed eight lawsuits in the U.S. against computer systems builders and resellers for allegedly distributing counterfeit software and software components, it said today.
The suits were filed against Abacus Computer Corp. in Anaheim, Calif.; Technology One in Los Angeles; Avantek Inc. in Orlando; First E-Commerce in Austin; M&S Computer Products Inc. in Boonton, N.J.; Micro Excell Inc. in Gadsden, Ala.; Odyssey Computers in Pasadena, Md.; and Signature PC in Warwick, R.I.

The suits allege copyright and trademark infringement and were filed after the software maker sent cease-and-desist letters to the companies, said Microsoft, which filed similar suits against eight other dealers in 2004.

That story here.

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