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Fedora Scientific, an interview with Amit Saha

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Linux
Interviews

Our latest interview is with Amit Saha, responsible for Fedora Scientific, a Fedora based distribution geared towards scientists, students and professionals alike. The distribution is packed with software like GNU Octave, R, Maxima and many more. Give Fedora Scientific a spin! Enjoy the interview!

F4S: Hello Amit, thank you for agreeing to the interview. Please, give us a brief introduction about yourself.

I am Amit and currently doing my Ph.D research at the University of New South Wales, Australia. I took up Linux 10 years back and have been involved in few Open Source projects from time to time. I also write quite regularly for Linux Magazines.

F4S: What is Fedora Scientific?

Fedora Scientific Spin brings together the open source scientific and numerical tools used in research along with the goodness of the Fedora KDE desktop. Thus, simply put Fedora scientific is a Fedora Linux flavour custom made for users whose work and play involves scientific and numerical computing.

rest here




Fedora Scientific spin

Strange not to even mention Scientific Linux 6.2 But hey FLOSS is as FLOSS does. Smile

Why is it strange? It was a

Why is it strange? It was a short interview about a niche Fedora spin; SL doesn't even compete with it being mostly RHEL (i.e. lacks a lot of software and by default comes as minimal as RHEL).

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