Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Why Does Kubuntu Suck?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Why does Kubuntu suck? I don’t think it sucks. However after reading a lot of comments recently on the Internet about the death of Kubuntu and KDE (sarcasm there) a lot of people think it does. I read stuff like:

* “Kubuntu is the worst distro ever!“
* “Kubuntu has been dead since day one“
* “Nobody cares about Kubuntu anyways“

If you are one of those people who have said something like the above recently, why? I want solid reasons and I don’t want to hear stuff like:

rest here




Kubuntu Sucks

Why does Kubuntu suck?

* The name sucks. REAL people would NEVER take it seriously - crash test out loud any conversation with the word "Kubuntu" and you'll feel ultra lame.

* The package manager is overly complicated and lacking simplicity and functionality - the most important piece of ubuntu's success.

* They're not as organized as Ubuntu with Ask Ubuntu, Brainstorm, Centralized Community Forums and a focus on simplicity and simple looks.

Actually, Kubuntu really plays a large role in ruining KDE's name to fame - every time I want to install KDE as a first-class DE Kubuntu is the only distribution that comes to mind - and every release it's terrible does exactly what the name implies - not live up to it's role model Ubuntu.

It's amazingly hard to find a KDE distro debian based - too bad KDE doesn't take on the challenge themselves and create an official distro.

PS: Now that Kubuntu is dropped from the Canonical family and part of Blue Systems - they really need to drop the name - it's just as bad as when Mandrake became Mandriva.

Re: Kubuntu

On the other hand, one can always install Synaptic under Kubuntu with sudo apt-get install synaptic. It's the fastest and simplest package manager I know.

Agreed on the name. But it's only a name.

Actually, I've installed the last three versions of Kubuntu on one of my home machines...and I find the KDE stuff has become better and better. (I Haven't yet installed Kubuntu "Precise Pangolin").

With Kubuntu's repository sharing with Ubuntu, the package depth and variety is amazing.

Yes, KDE Debian based distros are scarce.

And Kubuntu manages to keep its packages fairly up-to-date without becoming wildly unstable.

While not my preferred daily desktop distro, Kubuntu does have its good points.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

SUSE: GCC and GSoC in OpenSUSE/SLES

  • SLES 12 Toolchain Update Brings new Developer Tools
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Updates Its Developer Toolchain to GCC 7
    SUSE's Andreas Jaeger writes in a blog post about the updated toolchain of the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 operating system and the new developer tools it brings. The article notes the fact that with the release of GNU Compiler Collection 7, the GCC team brought numerous improvements for developers, including better diagnostics, DWARF 5 support, as well as support for the C++ 17 standard. GCC 7 also contains improved optimization passes and takes advantage of some of the features of modern processors, and now it is available to all SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 customers with an active subscription.
  • Become a Google Summer of Code Mentor for openSUSE
    The application period for organizations wanting to participate in the Google Summer of Code is now and the openSUSE project is once again looking for mentors who are willing to put forth projects to mentor GSoC students.

Android Leftovers

Security: Purism, Intel, Wi-Fi, iOS

  • Purism patches Meltdown and Spectre variant 2, both included in all new Librem laptops
    Purism has released a patch for Meltdown (CVE-2017-5754, aka variant 3) as part of PureOS, and includes this latest PureOS image as part of all new Librem laptop shipments. Purism is also providing a microcode update for Intel processors to address Spectre variant 2 (CVE-2017-5715).
  • Intel Fumbles Its Patch for Chip Flaw
    Intel is quietly advising some customers to hold off installing patches that address new security flaws affecting virtually all of its processors. It turns out the patches had bugs of their own.
  • Wi-Fi Alliance announces WPA3 to secure modern networks
    The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is an odd place to announce an enterprise product, but the Wi-Fi Alliance used the massive trade show — which has more or less taken over where Comdex left off — to announce a major upgrade to Wi-Fi security. The alliance announced the Wi-Fi Protected Access 3 (WPA3), a new standard of Wi-Fi security that greatly increases the security capabilities of the wireless standard. WPA2, which is the current standard in wireless security, has been around for 14 years, so this is way overdue.
  • More iOS 11 Jailbreak Tweaks Could Be Released by the Weekend
    The Electra jailbreak tool is better than LiberiOS because it comes with Substitute. This is the alternative to Cydia substrate that was first developed by Comex. This would allow users to install and use jailbreak tweaks compatible to iOS 11.

Toughened up SODIMM-style COM taps i.MX8M

CompuLab’s rugged, 68 x 42mm “CL-SOM-iMX8” computer-on-module runs Yocto or Android on NXP’s dual- or quad-core Cortex-A53 i.MX8M, with up to 4GB LPDDR4, up to 64GB eMMC, onboard wireless, and PCIe and HDMI 2.0 support. CompuLab’s CL-SOM-iMX8 COM, which ships with an optional SBC-iMX8 Evaluation Kit, shares many features with Variscite’s recently announced DART-MX8M module, which similarly features NXP’s new i.MX8M SoC. The CL-SOM-iMX8 is slightly larger, at 68 x 42mm, and adds shock (50G/20ms) and vibration (20G/0-600Hz) resistance. Read more Also: 5.25-inch SBCs offer Kaby Lake or Skylake in S- and H-series options