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Researchers create world's first transparent integrated circuit

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Researchers at Oregon State University have created the world's first completely transparent integrated circuit from inorganic compounds, another major step forward for the rapidly evolving field of transparent electronics.

Transparent electronics, scientists say, may hold the key to new industries, employment opportunities, and new, more effective or less costly consumer products. Uses could range from transparent displays in the windshield of an automobile to cell phones, televisions, copiers, "smart" glass or game and toy applications. More efficient solar cells or better liquid crystal displays are possible.

When perfected, researchers say, some transparent electronics applications may be so cheap and effective that they could be used in "throw away" devices, or used to replace conventional circuits that don't even require transparency.

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