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The death of Firefox

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Moz/FF

It doesn’t look good for Firefox: Almost every month for the last three years, Firefox has lost ground to Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Safari. For most of 2009 the trend was fairly straight as it fended off Chrome and nibbled away at IE, but between 2010 and today Firefox has lost a third of its market share, from a worldwide peak of around 30% down to 20%.

You can look at this two ways. First, the total number of people on the internet is growing, so while Firefox’s share has decreased, the total number of people using Firefox is increasing. The other point of view is that Firefox, whether you like it or not, is declining in popularity.

I love the Fox as much as the next bearded geek, but




Re:The death of Firefox

Seems to me that if 1% is good enough to keep linux alive, 20% should be more than enough to keep Firefox going. These doom and gloomers really need to get a life...

Re:Firefox add-ons are tools not apps ? Extensions ?

It may come as a shock to you, but not everyone is eagerly jumping on the "Cloud." That is what Chrome is, isn't it? I don't think I'm the only person on the planet that wants nothing to do with putting my personal life out on some unknown server under the control of an unknown entity. These things are called PC's for a reason. I don't even trust Google with my search information, there's no way I'll be writing documents, spreadsheets, presentations and emails in their cloud. That stuff stays right here, on my own personal hard drive.

I also don't think, but I could be wrong about this one, that I'm the only person on the planet stuck with dial-up internet. Cloud computing on dial-up would be impossible even if I were to want to.

I love Firefox and think that the folks working on it do a great job. I personally wish they'd slow down with the updates and just release new versions when they are ready and relevant.

dialup limited cloud use firefox, WiFi use Chrome ?

atang2 wrote:
It will take too long for dialup accounts to download firefox update of 18 mBs on some of their versions.

Chrome browser needs free WiFi/b to have data streaming. A lot of hotspots spill out to the street, that you can use with a laptop or tablet on batteries.

You will enjoy the big cloud.

No, I will not enjoy the big cloud, even it was hovering outside my door. Dial-up teaches patience and helps you realize that it isn't necessary to constantly update to the latest and greatest. If it ain't broke, don't fix it...

I have to drive a minimum of 8 miles to reach a free hotspot, and working 57 hours a week, I don't have time or energy for loading up my laptop and hauling to the cafe for updates. 18MB doesn't really take that long and I can let the computer do it overnight if need be.

No, I'll stick with keeping control of my pc and the files on it, and stick with firefox. Feel free to "enjoy the big cloud" without me.

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