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Red Hat is proud of Linux's success

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Linux

One of the most famous Linux distributions, Red Hat, has all the reasons to be proud because of the association with several European top companies that operate in the financial and insurance segments.

You can't remain indifferent when a company like BPU Banca from Italy transfers on all 8,000 Sun Microsystems Unix workstations the Red Hat Linux Desktop operating system, and all the servers will be equipped with the operating system developed by Red Hat.

And this takes place a short time after the insurance company LVM Versicherungun from Germany signed a contract stipulating that 8,500 clients will migrate to the Red Hat desktop solution; in 2000, the company turned to an internally configured Linux solution. The contract states that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 Desktop will be installed on all desktop computers and notebooks from the headquarters in Munsterm, but also at all branches operating within Germany.

The LVM desktops will have a mail client, an image viewer, an Internet browser, but also the Java application system, which offers text editing, a CRM solution (customer relationship management) and solutions for solving certain requests from clients. These desktops will be administered through a Red Hat Network management server.

BPU Banca, the founding company of the Banche Popolari Unite network, will use Red Hat Network for maintenance, liquidities administering and security solutions related to Linux systems administering; the transition from Unix to Linux will be carried out by the end of the year.

Red Hat has announced that another important company is interested in the adoption of the opens-source operating system. The company in question is Statoil and it will make the same transition from Unix to Linux. The company hopes this change will reduce with 50% the costs related to the number of hours required to administer the Linux solutions and the price of the hardware components.

Source.

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