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Linux Mint’s Cinnamon 1.2 deployed for openSUSE

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Software

Cinnamon Desktop

Cinnamon is an alternative Linux Desktop which provides a traditional user experience, very close to GNOME 2 and it’s underlying technology is forked from gnome-shell. Cinnamon features the traditional gnome-panel layout with a main menu, notification area, work space indicators, etc. Cinnamon’s configuration is made through a configuration tool known as ‘cinnamon-settings’.

Cinnamon in openSUSE

Thanks to Vincent Untz and the GNOME Team it was possible to grab a GNOME:Cinnamon namespace/project on openSUSE Build Service to provide openSUSE users the latest release of Cinnamon (1.2). Currently this repository only hold the very own basic packages required for cinnamon which include:

rest here




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