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Introduction To Linux Commands

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

At the heart of every modern Mac and Linux computer is the “terminal.” Mac, Linux and Windows computers today are mainly controlled through user-friendly feature-rich GUI. So, why would anyone want to bother with these text commands when you can use the mouse instead?

The main reason is that they are very useful for controlling remote computers on which a GUI is not available, particularly Web servers, and especially Linux Web servers that have been stripped of all unnecessary graphical software.

Sometimes these lean Linux servers are managed through a Web browser interface, such as cPanel or Plesk, letting you create databases, email addresses and websites; but sometimes that is not enough. This article provides a broad introduction to text commands and the situations in which they are useful.

We’ll cover the following:




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