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5 Reasons Why KDE Is Better Than Unity

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KDE

It’s no secret that KDE is not the most popular desktop environment. In many ways, it’s exotic, having no other desktops environments forked or built from it. It seems to stand alone in excellence. Here are five detailed reasons why KDE is better than Unity.

5 It’s hyper-polished

If you need to spend an exorbitant amount of time in front of a computer screen then you will want it to look good. There really is no comparison between the default Oxygen theme– and now the oxygen font– and Ubuntu’s sleepy, low-contrast color-scheme and hard-gradient Ambiance theme. The separation of Plasma and the basic widget-set for drawing windows was a wise decision by the KDE project!

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