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Gael Duval: Fired, simply fired.

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Fired. Yes. Simply fired, for economical reasons, along with a few other ones. More than 7 years after I created Mandrake-Linux and then Mandrakesoft, the current boss of Mandriva "thanks me" and I'm leaving, sad, with my two-month salary indemnity standard package. It's difficult to accept that back in 1998 I created my job and the one of many other people, and that recently, on a February afternoon, Mandriva's CEO called to tell me that I was leaving.

Bad mood, yes. For two reasons: it's a pity that Mandriva still needs to fire people since we had put the company break-even in 2003/2004 et that it was decided that it should keep on that way. The second reason of course is that I'm part of this lay-off. Hard to swallow.

Obviously, I should have expected to be fired since my recent switch of activity at Mandriva certainly fragilized my position, so I could be thanked at the first opportunity. What are the reasons why I've been fired? Without entering into details, I guess that my relationship with the current Mandriva CEO (and soon President of the Board) which hasn't always been excellent, has been a factor. But I didn't think he would do that.

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