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Happy Birthday Susan aka srlinuxx

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Humor

Happy Birthday Susan aka srlinuxx!!! I can't believe you are 39 yet again! Big Grin Hope you have a great day and a prosperous New Year.

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re: Happy Birthday

Thanks so much. Hardly anyone remembers anymore - including me. Big Grin

Happy New Year everyone!

Happy New Year & Happy

Happy New Year & Happy birthday, Susan! Live long and prosper, and bring more linux news Smile

re: happy, happy, happy

"and bring more linux news"

I'm trying to get back to regular schedule. I wasn't well today, but was determined to get back to the grindstone. When out of blue with no warning my main monitor went out. Of course being the Linux guru that I am, I managed to shut the computer down blind. Big Grin

So, anyway, I found me a nice monitor in a local pawn shop and am back up now.

Way to go!

Way to go! Smile

Have a Happy Birthday

Keep writing the articles - I really enjoy your news.

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