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OpenSUSE 12.1 Proffers Polish and Performance

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SUSE

It should come as no surprise that the 12.1 release of OpenSUSE delivers a polished, high-performing operating system fit for just about any task. This version includes many cutting-edge open source projects, including things like the Chromium 17 browser, GNOME 3.2 and the KDE Plasma Desktop 4.7. Underneath the covers you'll find kernel version 3.1 along with many other improvements, not the least of which is systemd for speeding up the boot process.

If you choose to install Btrfs as your default file system, you can take advantage of the new snapshot capability. Snapper is the new system configuration tracker, which makes it possible to roll back to any previous snapshot if you're using Btrfs. For a full description of all the new features, check out the portal site for the 12.1 release along with an Official Start-Up Guide to help get you going. If you're new to GNOME 3, you'll find a help application available from the search tool once you have the system up and running.

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