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Introducing the Humble Deteriorating Bundle!

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I can proudly say I purchased the first Humble Bundle (the "Humble Indie Bundle"), and I can say I'm glad to have not purchased the last seven. Why? I know what you're thinking, "It's a good deal, and it's monetary motivation for developers to port their games to Linux, and remove any pre-existing DRM." Yeah, yeah, but that's nothing compared to the first Humble Bundle.

The first Humble Bundle included games like World of Goo, Aquaria, Gish, Lugaru, Samorost 2 (as a bonus game) and the full 3-D first-person shooter "Penumbra: Overture". And once one million dollars was raised the source code for the game engines for Gish, Penumbra, Lugaru, and Aquaria, was released as Free and Open Source software under the GNU General Public License, however, the art, music, and other creative assets for these games were not included.

World of Goo, Gish, and Penumbra are all very successful indie game titles, however, success isn't the most important thing for these bundles (hence the name "Humble Indie Bundle"), but more often than not quality games become successful games.

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Re: Introducing the Humble Deteriorating Bundle!

For the most part, I agree with the idea behind this article, but it seems the author is awfully hung-up on graphics and what comes off as being a "Flash" game.

The first Humble Bundle was excellent and it really felt cool to support both indie developers and charities. But since then, each bundle has come out with less time since the last one, and to me, some of the luster has just been lost. It's obvious that the accelerated releases are all about profit, and so far that's been going well. From a "feeling" standpoint, I think I'd care a lot more about these if they were released quarterly, not monthly.

Either way, being able to get good games on the cheap is hardly a bad thing.

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