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The Document Foundation Announces LibreOffice 3.4.4

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The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 3.4.4, an improved version of the award-winning free office suite for Windows, Mac and Linux. LibreOffice has recently won InfoWorld’s BOSSIE Award 2011 as Best of Open Source Software, and the Open World Forum Experiment Award of Most-Popular Software.

SUSE’s Andras Timar, who manages the LibreOffice localization effort, says, “Thanks to the contribution of Michael Bauer, a volunteer who took the long-time-abandoned Scottish Gaelic version and produced a complete UI translation in just a few months, LibreOffice 3.4.4 adds yet another native-language version, bringing the total to 105. This shows the unparalleled value of copyleft licenses for end user software, as LibreOffice is now the most-important office suite when it comes to protecting cultural heritage worldwide, especially when the number of native speakers is not sufficiently attractive for large corporations to devote localization resources to.”

Today, TDF and LibreOffice will also be on stage at the Libre Software World Conference (LSWC) in Zaragoza, where Jesus Corrius – a deputy member of the TDF Board of Directors – will keynote about “TDF: the home of LibreOffice”. LSWC is the most-prominent free software event in Spain, and the presence of a member of the TDF Board of Directors is a testimonial of the efforts that the project is devoting to developing a large and diverse Spanish-speaking community, in which each local community in Europe and the Americas can grow and thrive within a single global project.

LibreOffice 3.4.4 is available for immediate download from the following link: http://www.libreoffice.org/download/. Extensions for LibreOffice are available from the following link: http://extensions.libreoffice.org/extension-center.

Change logs are available at http://ftp.snt.utwente.nl/pub/software/tdf/libreoffice/src/bugfixes-libreoffice-3-4-release-3.4.4.1.log (fixed in 3.4.4.1) and http://download.documentfoundation.org/libreoffice/src/bugfixes-libreoffice-3-4-4-release-3.4.4.2.log (fixed in 3.4.4.2).

Original Announcement




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