Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Document Foundation Announces LibreOffice 3.4.4

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 3.4.4, an improved version of the award-winning free office suite for Windows, Mac and Linux. LibreOffice has recently won InfoWorld’s BOSSIE Award 2011 as Best of Open Source Software, and the Open World Forum Experiment Award of Most-Popular Software.

SUSE’s Andras Timar, who manages the LibreOffice localization effort, says, “Thanks to the contribution of Michael Bauer, a volunteer who took the long-time-abandoned Scottish Gaelic version and produced a complete UI translation in just a few months, LibreOffice 3.4.4 adds yet another native-language version, bringing the total to 105. This shows the unparalleled value of copyleft licenses for end user software, as LibreOffice is now the most-important office suite when it comes to protecting cultural heritage worldwide, especially when the number of native speakers is not sufficiently attractive for large corporations to devote localization resources to.”

Today, TDF and LibreOffice will also be on stage at the Libre Software World Conference (LSWC) in Zaragoza, where Jesus Corrius – a deputy member of the TDF Board of Directors – will keynote about “TDF: the home of LibreOffice”. LSWC is the most-prominent free software event in Spain, and the presence of a member of the TDF Board of Directors is a testimonial of the efforts that the project is devoting to developing a large and diverse Spanish-speaking community, in which each local community in Europe and the Americas can grow and thrive within a single global project.

LibreOffice 3.4.4 is available for immediate download from the following link: http://www.libreoffice.org/download/. Extensions for LibreOffice are available from the following link: http://extensions.libreoffice.org/extension-center.

Change logs are available at http://ftp.snt.utwente.nl/pub/software/tdf/libreoffice/src/bugfixes-libreoffice-3-4-release-3.4.4.1.log (fixed in 3.4.4.1) and http://download.documentfoundation.org/libreoffice/src/bugfixes-libreoffice-3-4-4-release-3.4.4.2.log (fixed in 3.4.4.2).

Original Announcement




More in Tux Machines

Optimize your Linux rig for top-notch writing

I'm a big fan of Scott Nesbitt's writing, which has a technological bent, but is usually more about working effectively, rather than how tools can make you effective, which is a key distinction. Scott's setup reflects his focus on production rather than tweaking. He has his work tools and everything else is pretty much white noise—which is why LXDE/Lubuntu probably makes a lot of sense for his workflow. It's simple and it stays out of his way. Scott also gets bonus points for moving his family to Linux. That's a tough move, but given that his wife stole his ZaReason laptop, the conversion seems to have taken. Read more

IBM meets demand for Linux with training resources

IBM HAS REAFFIRMED its commitment to Linux with the announcement of an extension to Power Systems Linux. Following on from the company's $1bn financial commitment to the Linux operating system last year, IBM will add Power Systems Linux to the Power Systems services already available for AIX and IBM iSeries servers at 54 IBM Innovation Centres and Client Centres. This will enable Linux systems to better use IBM's Power8 parallel processing and advanced virtualisation. Read more

How Red Hat can catch the developer train

Outside the operating system, according to AngelList data compiled by Leo Polovets, these developers go with MySQL, MongoDB, or PostgreSQL for their database; Chef or Puppet for configuration; and ElasticSearch or Solr for search. None of this technology is developed by Red Hat. Yet all of this technology is what the next generation of developers is using to build modern applications. Given that developers are the new kingmakers, Red Hat needs to get out in front of the developer freight train if it wants to remain relevant for the next 20 years, much less the next two. Read more

Shortlist of open source software used at NASA lab

The offer was too good to be true. Three whole weeks at the NASA Glenn Research Center and an invitation to come back. I could scarcely believe it when I read the email. I immediately forwarded it to my parents with an addition of around 200 exclamation points. They were all for it, so I responded to my contact, Herb Schilling, with a resounding “YES!” Read more