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Mozilla puts Firefox on a memory diet

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Moz/FF

Firefox’s single largest consumer of RAM, its JavaScript engine SpiderMonkey, is going on the mother of all diets. At any one time, SpiderMonkey’s memory footprint can be over 50% of Firefox’s total usage — the JavaScript on the ExtremeTech homepage, for example, uses no less than 115MB of memory — and slipstreaming SpiderMonkey is by far the best change that Mozilla can make to keep Firefox on the desktop svelte and competitive with Chrome and IE, and Firefox on Android less sluggish.

If you’re not a programmer, you should probably skip this paragraph. Basically, almost every fundamental part of SpiderMonkey is being torn apart, turned over in the hands of Mozilla’s finest engineers, and rejigged to use less memory.

rest here




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