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The Fickle Fate of Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

In various geek circles, most of the smart money has turned away from Firefox and toward the Chrome browser. I must admit that I'm getting a little tired of Firefox since it now handles files on my main Vista writing machine poorly—or at least version 3.6.23 handles them poorly. The details are boring but let's just say there are idiosyncrasies that force me to use Chrome in too many instances.

Over the past year, all I've been hearing about is Chrome this and Chrome that. It renders better. It's faster. It's slicker. Now people look at me like I'm crazy if I tell them that I'm using Firefox. I'm like one of those guys still using Yahoo! as a search engine in the early days when people were moving to Google. What a bonehead.

So I suppose I'll be moving, despite my long appreciation of Firefox.

The overall story says something about open source.




Aw SNAP!

Chrome crashes on me all the time lately.

%

Yes, Chromium still crashes a lot. Unacceptable to become my main browser. And my site statistics still show more than 50% FF users and between 19-24% Chrome/ium users, depending on the week.

Supporting GNU/Linux

I don't find it very supportive, you can't even truly integrate into the desktop theme, and how long has it been developed now? That tells me that they only want it the Google way. That's fine, but obviously they're not playing nice as other projects do with any standard GNU/Linux Distribution. Not even touching the whole upstream Chrome thing.

Keep your stick on the ice...

Landor

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