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Linux Mint developers make GNOME 3 edition plans

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Linux

Clement Lefebvre, Linux Mint Founder and lead developer, has announced that his project has started work on a GNOME 3 edition of its next major release, version 12. The new edition will initially be developed alongside the GNOME 2.32-based release which will remain as the default desktop environment of Mint. The developers had decided to stick with GNOME 2.32 because there had been "radical changes" in GNOME 3.x's desktop which had split the communities of GNOME and Mint users.

In a post on the Linux Mint blog, Lefebvre says that they will use the recent 3.2 release of GNOME as it is "more mature" than previous versions of GNOME 3. He says that the development team "can see the potential of this new desktop and use it to implement something that can look and behave better than anything based on GNOME 2". It is unlikely though that the first release of a GNOME 3 Mint will be complete: "Of course, we’re starting from scratch and this process can take some time and span across multiple releases" said Lefebvre.

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Clem is always one step ahead of the game

You have to take your hat off to Clem, he's always thinking ahead, for sure. This definitely shows it. I believe that GNOME 3 and the GNOME Shell are rapidly improving, and predict that by this time next year it will be a fairly polished combination. Clem's intelligent to start work on it now, get people interested within his community, and not only that, but accustomed to it as well, to grow with its improvements.

What will be the hardest part is trying to separate Linux Mint's offering from the other distributions that are shipping GNOME 3/GNOME Shell, due to not being able to customize it fully. I'm sure though by the time Clem is ready to either launch it as his main DE, or not, that kind of customization, and branding will no longer be an issue.

Good Luck to Clem and the Mint Team.

Keep your stick on the ice...

Landor

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