Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Free software founder, Richard M. Stallman is glad Jobs is gone

Filed under
OSS

Some stuff you can’t make up. While many of us sorrow at Apple founder Steve Jobs’ death, and others acknowledge Jobs’ genius while also admitting that he had his flaws, Richard M. Stallman, aka rms, founder of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), stated on his blog that “I’m not glad he’s dead, but I’m glad he’s gone.”

OK, we get it that the father of free software isn’t going to think anything nice about proprietary software’s biggest champion, but come on! As my grandmother used to say, “If you don’t have anything good to say, then don’t say anything at all.”

rest here




What a P.O.S.

There's a saying that goes: "Beauty is skin deep, but ugly goes clean to the bone", this arrogant ward of the university set is extremely ugly to the bone.

This isn't Stallman's best

This isn't Stallman's best moment, but the headline/"soundbite" makes it sound worse than it was. Stallman was paraphrasing, like "as the old saying goes, I'm not glad he's dead, but I'm glad he's gone".

Besides, the world needs some counterbalance to Jobs' beatification in the media.

sure...

... and then there's this one: beauty is truth, truth beauty Smile

Stallmans best moment

Stallmans best moment was when he picked something off is foot and put it in his mouth during a seminar. What has been seen cannot be unseen! Looks like he might have stuck his foot in his mouth again with the statement about Jobs.

The original comment and some of the follow-ups ...

... are the sort of vile drivel we hear so often these days from the cheery, yet clueless, easily manipulated, easily dominated crowd of mostly younger conformists who have no real IT skills, no real interests and no ideas of their own. To compensate for this form of social autism they find most things "awesome" ... There was a time, not so long ago, when younger people were in the forefront of the struggle for a more equal, more just and more honest society. Today they're the most backward and reactionary.

Here's to RMS without whom we wouldn't have free and open software today.

For those who are interested to find out more about the many dark sides of ex-arch-capitalist Steve Jobs just Google around ... the Internet is full of information about Apple's murderous slave labor regime in Chengdu, China ... about Apple's paranoid and highly intrusive surveillance of its employees and its customers ... of Apple's insanely aggressive armies of lawyers who come down like a ton of bricks on anyone who dares to stray from the path of Apple righteousness which Saint Steve has defined for his own benefit ... etc. etc. ...

I fully agree with Richard's comment. Steve Jobs' death is a tragedy and a great loss for his family and his friends. No-one should die at the age of 56. But to ignore that in other parts of the world his way of "doing business" has driven many into poverty, despair and suicide would be callous.

here here

here here

wow

A public figure commenting on someones death in the manner RMS did is nothing short of disgusting. He has a lifetime to comment on the merits of Jobs career. To issue such comments just after the mans death in a public forum fully viewable to his family, friends, and colleagues is callous and pathetic. Richard Stallman is a degenerate freak and a massive liability to the movement he professes to lead.

Re: wow

> A public figure commenting on someones death in the
> manner RMS did is nothing short of disgusting.

... calling someone a "degenerate freak" because they express an opinion you disagree with is even more disgusting. I also wonder if you have even bothered to read what Richard Stallman has written. Have a look here ...

http://www.muktware.com/news/2618

... and all will be explained.

I agree. "Degenerate Freak"

I agree. "Degenerate Freak" is far worse.

SJVN at his worst.

He drags RMS's comment from his homely handmade blog where almost no one would see it, and publicly harrumphs so that he can get a lot of hits, people can post outraged comments and nothing of value can be arrived at.

Learn to read, fucktards. RMS is, as always, is the ultimate purist, but he carefully places Jobs' humanity first. his humanity is more important than the damage that RMS believes that he did. No, Steve Jobs did not deserve to die. he carefully makes the point, then he says what he believes is true. I believe that in putting Jobs' humanity first, RMS shows the required amount of respect and compassion. Not a lot, but more than the people who want to smear him.

The comments on CNET are beyond clueless. "What has Stallman done for me, the end user?" He hasn't done much, I guess. I mean, he didn't actually write the code, but some of the things he made possible include Google, Firefox, Android, and the software that enables most of the internet. Compared to Jobs, Stallman is the greater innovator. I don't care how much you love your Iphone; Steve Jobs didn't invent consumerism. Stallman invented a whole new model for human enterprise. This idea that he is bitter and envious is ignorant and delusional. It's true that free software still can't make an iphone, but don't expect that kind of thinking to impress RMS. He's one of those annoying idealists who cares more about principles than about products. Yeah, he's crazy. He's certainly not perfect. He's better than you, though.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

The Machine with Open Source Carbon OS is the Next Big Thing – if HP can deliver

HP has recently been facing some serious difficulties and has opted to betting all its resources on the new PC called ‘The Machine’. Probably the most intriguing thing about the machine is that it will rewrite basic computing on a very fundamental level. While the topic has been covered extensively, I realized we haven’t actually touched it here and thought it was about time. Read more

YEAR of the PENGUIN: A Linux mobile in 2015?

It's nearly impossible to sum up an entire year of developments in something as large and nebulous as the world of desktop Linux, especially in a year like this one which has seen some the best releases that projects like Mint, Fedora and openSUSE have put out to date. At the same time the distro that's closest to being a household name, Ubuntu, has been nearly silent since 14.04 arrived in April. To paraphrase author Charles Dickens, the past year of Linux releases has been both the best of times and the worst of times. At the very moment that Linux desktops seem to be reaching new levels of sophistication, polish and "just works" ease-of-use, the entire future of the desktop computer (by which I also mean laptop) feels in doubt. Read more

Jolla's Sailfish OS Update 10 Is Now Available

The tenth update to Jolla's Sailfish mobile operating system is now available. This update is version 1.1.1.26 and is codenamed Vaarainjärvi. Read more

Forget Google's robot cars, now it's on to ANDROID cars

Google is planning a big push into in-car infotainment systems with an upcoming version of Android, sources claim. "Android M" – the version to come after the current Android 5.0 "Lollipop" – will be available in a formulation designed specifically to run cars' built-in screens, Reuters reports, citing anonymous insiders with knowledge of the plan. Google made its first advances toward the automotive world at its I/O developer conference earlier this year, when it unveiled its Android Auto software. The first Android Auto–compatible cars are expected to arrive early next year. Read more