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AriOS 3.0 - Not as good as its predecessor

AriOS is a small, fledgling Ubuntu fork with a relatively decent level of integration that is normally reserved to bigger distributions. In its very first incarnation, while it was still called mFatOS, this operating system achieved average results. It worked well, but it was a bit jumbled, a bit cluttered. It tried to offer as much functionality as possible without strict reliance on high-speed Internet connectivity, but some of the user experience was marred by simply adding too much stuff. Version 2, called AriOS, was much more moderate, far more refined, with a decent level of polish, good applications choice and stability.

Now, AriOS 3.0 is out there. As a potential candidate to becoming a complete, truly successful Ubuntu derivative, an accolade which has so far been reserved to only Linux Mint, I took the distro for a spin, with high spirits and higher expectations. Tested: the 32-bit version, on my T60p experimentation rig. There's a 64-bit version, too.

Rest here




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