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Something Gnome3 and Unity could Stand to Learn from Windows 8

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Software

I've mentioned a few times now that I don't understand this touch infatuation technology has developed in recent years. What ever the reason, there is no doubting this technology is going to be around for some time. In the Linux world the releases of the Gnome 3 and Unity desktops have been pushing a touch-geared interface not only to touch-screen devices, but also the large screen of your home PC! Mac's OSX followed this line of thinking and it appears Microsoft's Window 8 will be no different:

It is still early, but there appears to be one important detail that Microsoft is getting correct that Gnome 3, Unity, and OSX all seem to have failed at.

rest here




GNOME 3/Unity didn't learn from Windows Vista

Windows Vista was a dog on hardware which had run XP or required a hardware update to run at all. In a similar fashion, GNOME3 and Unity 3D take a performance hit on those computers which COULD run the new versions, and on the older machines which don't run the new interfaces at all, DOES NOT FALLBACK GRACEFULLY! or requires a hardware update.

My present machine is one which has to have the 'Ubuntu Classic (no effects)' session selected or run another DE or else it locks up. I don't consider a dual-core/2G RAM machine to be ready for the scrap heap, either!

Unity system requirements

I run Unity smoothly on a desktop I assembled can't remember when with an AMD AthlonXP processor (Pentium 4 generation) and NVidia Geforce 6600 graphics (bought in 2005). With a dual core you should be able to run Vista smoothly too!

I'm not talking about whether Unity is a good or bad idea, just that it runs on a P4 type comp with 6 year old graphics. I doubt Vista would, let alone Win8, "classic" or not.

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