Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Rock on with the top OSS music apps

Filed under
Software

The RIAA might as well give it up and move into the 21st Century - it is acting like a lone stranded Japanese soldier battling on in the Pacific in 1947. Despite all attempts to stem the flow, digital music stored on hard drives and flash disks has become the predominant music standard. We live in a world of Oggs, MP3s and MP4s; iPods and MP3 walkmans; MP3 car stereos and home media servers. The wars is definitely over.

If you don't work for the RIAA, and you're not an octogenarian living in a cave on a Pacific island wearing a very rusty helmet, then you probably have a fair collection of digital music by now - whether licensed or not. Now to manage it all and maybe even listen to it occasionally, from Abba to ZZ Top. Enter the wonderful world of open source music managers and players.

Here's a list of Tectonic's favourite players and managers. We're not looking to start a religious debate, so if you think your player is infinitely superior to our choices, be sure to send us a comment.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Kernel Space/Linux

today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more