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Rock on with the top OSS music apps

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Software

The RIAA might as well give it up and move into the 21st Century - it is acting like a lone stranded Japanese soldier battling on in the Pacific in 1947. Despite all attempts to stem the flow, digital music stored on hard drives and flash disks has become the predominant music standard. We live in a world of Oggs, MP3s and MP4s; iPods and MP3 walkmans; MP3 car stereos and home media servers. The wars is definitely over.

If you don't work for the RIAA, and you're not an octogenarian living in a cave on a Pacific island wearing a very rusty helmet, then you probably have a fair collection of digital music by now - whether licensed or not. Now to manage it all and maybe even listen to it occasionally, from Abba to ZZ Top. Enter the wonderful world of open source music managers and players.

Here's a list of Tectonic's favourite players and managers. We're not looking to start a religious debate, so if you think your player is infinitely superior to our choices, be sure to send us a comment.

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