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OpenOffice.org 2.0.2 Is Here

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OpenOffice.org 2.0.2 is available today. This release is recommended for everyone. It contains some new features, fixes many small bugs, and resolves numerous issues.

The spellcheck dictionary in German and some other languages is now directly integrated into OpenOffice.org, so there is no need for a separate download for those languages. The community have further added import filters for Quattro Pro 6 and Microsoft Word 2. As well, other import filters have been improved and it is now easier to use mail merge. Integration with the KDE address book is now possible.

The appearance has also been enhanced, and for Linux users, there are new icon sets for KDE and GNOME. (OpenOffice.org runs on Windows, Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X (X11)). The result of this and the other improvements is not just a prettier OpenOffice.org but a friendlier and more capable suite.

And it's free.

Downloads.

Release Notes.

HomePage.

KDE icon integration

Great improvement, but, when using "small" iconset, Left and Right justify look odd alongside the other two. You can change them and suitable icons exist in the folder:

/usr/share/icons/crystalsvg/16x16/actions

text_left.png and text_right.png

Ah that looks more consistent, much better!

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