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King of KDistros

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KDE
Linux

Well, done at last! After some time gathering opinions from readers and quite some more time testing each one of the contenders, I have finished my comparison of the best of the best in KDE distros.

THE CONTENDERS

The final list of contenders was not directly extracted from the poll I put together. I decided to include some other distros at some readers request, as well as leaving one behind. The infamous leftover was Chakra, which I didn't manage to install (used both 2011.4 and 2011.9 images and followed all suggestions in the project's own Wiki with identical results: None) and the additions were Mandriva and Fedora. The final list of contenders goes as follows:

OpenSUSE 11.4 (12.1 Milestone 5 was still too un stable)
Mandriva 2011
Fedora 15 (16 Alpha was still too unstable)
PCLinuxOS 2011
Kubuntu 11.04
Pardus 2011.1

rest here




King of KDistros

My dog is smarter than some of the comments to this article. lol

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