Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mea maxima culpa

Filed under

My friend Amber Graner, an editor at Ubuntu User magazine, took Jim Zemlin out to the woodshed over the topic of yesterday’s blog item, saying yesterday in a Google+ post to me:

“I take issue with leaders in the community using the word ‘idiot’ to describe users who don’t give back. While I realize the article was pointing to business at first glance the casual end user may think, ‘I use Linux but I’m not giving back yet?’ ‘Am I an idiot because I don’t know how or where my skills are needed?’ But maybe that’s just me reading everything through the lens of an end user. I think this message could have been conveyed differently without the use of name calling.”

rest here

Re:Mea maxima culpa

You know what, open source advocates really need to make up their minds. They spend an inordinate amount of time cajoling new users by constantly touting the fact that linux and other open source software is FREE. So now that someone takes them up on the offer, they turn around and insult them for just using that which is FREE and not really giving a crap about how the community does or does not function.

Those of us who love linux for the freedom it gives us to do what we want with our computers instead of what some OS maker thinks we want are already doing what we can to contribute, if not with code, with cash or some other helpful function that the community needs. But, when the community in general, not me, constantly attempts to gain new users, these users are coming from a different culture. They have no desire to learn anything new and seem to want linux to become whatever OS they have recently left behind because they came to linux only because it is free of cost.

This is why I think the community should stop being so preoccupied with growing in number and realize that the average end user has no interest in what happens under the hood of their OS. Let those who have a burning desire to learn find linux for themselves, that user will learn everything he can and automatically give back when and where he is capable. Like it or not, linux really is by geeks for geeks. I, for one, hope that never changes. I love the cli, but many of the new culture of end users would have it removed because it's too scary. Or they would have the number of distros reduced to some arbitrary number because the choices are too difficult for them to navigate. Well tough, there's already a limited GUI only OS available, return to it and leave my choice of OS alone.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

today's howtos

Intel Cache Allocation Technology / RDT Still Baking For Linux

Not mentioned in my earlier features you won't find in the Linux 4.9 mainline kernel is support for Intel's Cache Allocation Technology (CAT) but at least it was revised this weekend in still working towards mainline integration. Read more Also: Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more