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Open source: the future economy?

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OSS

When people asked Captain Kirk of Star Trek how much he got paid for his job, he answered that in the future, we don't use money any more _ people just work for the betterment of mankind. The concept puzzled me from an economics perspective. But having observed the open-source movement in the IT realm, I am starting to comprehend one direction that the economy of the future might take.

The concept of open-source starts from a small person who creates a small software product. He then releases the product with the source code and issues a licence to allow anybody else to take the product, study the source code, add features, fix bugs and re-release better and better products. Most of these people don't get direct reimbursement for their efforts.

Thousands of developers around the world join the collaborative development in their spare time. The result? The product gets improved at an astonishing speed that is no match for any commercial product. With thousands of eyes watching for bugs and thousands of hands writing codes at the same time all over the world, the combined effort is unbelievable.

Full Story.

comment and link brocken

I think it was Captain Pickard in Star Trek First Contact that explained how 'the economy of the future is somewhat different, you see, money doesn't exist in the 24th centuary' for Captain Kirk and the origional series of Star Trek I believe self gain was still a strong driving force.

PS the link posted here and by google news is broken the site is here: http://www.bangkokpost.com/Business/08Mar2006_biz009.php as for me anyway as of 16:00 GMT.

re: broken links

Thanks.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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