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Emu Software Taps Open Source Veteran for Executive Team

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Configuration Management Maker Adds Mark Hinkle as Vice President of Strategy and Business Development
Cary, North Carolina –March 7, 2006 – Emu Software – an open source configuration management company – announced that they have added Mark Hinkle as Vice President of Strategy and Business Development to their executive team. Mark is an open source industry veteran bringing extensive insight into Linux and the open source community. Mr. Hinkle is also the Editor-In-Chief of LinuxWorld Magazine and the author of the book, Windows to Linux Business Desktop Migration (Thomson/Delmar Learning 2006).

“Emu Software's success depends on the creation of a sustainable ecosystem of partners that together delivers end-to-end open source server lifecycle management solutions. Mark's deep industry and technology understanding and his relationships with key Linux and open source players made him the obvious choice to take the lead for Emu Software on these critical partnership initiatives” said Emu CEO Jim McHugh.

Hinkle served previously as Vice President of Business Development at Win4Lin, a provider of Windows virtualization software for Linux and Unix hosts. Prior to this, Hinkle was the Director of Technical Support with EarthLink (MindSpring), where he oversaw a 2,500-person organization responsible for supporting ISP and web hosting customers. During Mark's tenure at MindSpring, PC World recognized the company as having the best technical support in the industry, and they also achieved J.D. Power's highest overall customer satisfaction. During his MindSpring career, he also managed the development of many infrastructure projects that leveraged open source technologies to provide critical internal architecture.
“I am very enthusiastic to be joining Emu Software. Linux, Apache, Samba and other open source technologies are becoming the foundation of enterprise and service provider infrastructure. Emu Software’s NetDirector is a much needed solution to maximize the value of these technologies through configuration management efficiency and control.” Added Mark Hinkle.

“As Linux and open source adoption continue to grow, it’s critical to have high caliber-caliber and professionally-supported tools that enhance the usability and serviceability of open source servers. Emu’s NetDirector addresses the expanding requirements for management efficiency, rollback, and redundancy that spans all Linux distributions and platforms in the open source enterprise.”

About Emu Software

Emu Software, Inc. is the maker of the NetDirector Open Source Configuration Management System. Emu Software’s extensible management framework brings features such as rollback, policy-based administration, multi-server changes, and an ergonomic interface to open source systems. Emu Software is an IBM Business Partner and is designated as Red Hat Ready. Emu Software strives to be the leading cross-platform, cross-distribution configuration management solution for open source services such as Apache, Bind, Sendmail, and many others. Emu Software is headquartered in Cary, N.C. For more information, please visit

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