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22 Greatest Graphics Cards Of All Time

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Hardware

Meet The Most Legendary Graphics Cards

We thought it would be fun to walk down memory lane and recount the most powerful GPUs. We'll start back in 1996 with a single pixel pipeline and make our way to the present day with modern monsters capable of handling over 3000 pixel shader operations per clock!

1. March 1996: 3dfx Voodoo1

The first accomplished accelerator was 3dfx's original Voodoo. With a 50 MHz core/memory clock and 4 MB of RAM, this 3D-only product needed to be used in tandem with a 2D graphics card, as it was incapable of running Windows on its own. Despite that disadvantage, it delivered 3D frame rates superior to every other product on the market, easily beating the S3 Virge, ATI Rage II, and Rendition Verite 1000 chipsets.

2. Late 1997: Nvidia Riva 128

After more than a year of undisputed supremacy, 3dfx was finally usurped by an upstart company called Nvidia and its new Riva 128 3D accelerator. With a 100 MHz core/memory clock and 4 MB of SGRAM, the Riva 128 was probably the first real competition for the Voodoo chipset.

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