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Joli OS 1.2 Linux by Jolicloud

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Linux

With the launch of the Chromebook, a new breed of cut-price laptop running Google's Chrome OS software, the interest in so-called 'cloud computing' has never been higher. It's easy to forget, however, that before Google came along, there were other companies offering remarkably similar software packages that can be installed - for free, even - on existing hardware.

Cloud before Chromebook

Jolicloud, founded back in 2008 by Tariq Krim and now the parent company of the Joli OS distribution, is one of the most well-known desktop 'cloud' companies around. Designed as a spin-off of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution, Joli OS has grown into a popular alternative to Google's Chrome OS, and recently hit a major milestone in its history with the launch of Jolibook netbooks featuring the software pre-installed.

It's a powerful package, but it's not for everyone. We take a look at the pros and cons of making the leap to a cloud-based desktop operating system.

rest here




Jolicloud

Dumbest thing ever. For a good laugh, watch their video tour.

You can use your Web Browser to go to your Jolicloud desktop and do amazing things. With your Jolicloud desktop (in your web browser) you can do Google Doc's, or Drop Box, or Youtube, or Facebook - all from your Jolicloud desktop IN YOUR WEB BROWSER.

Wow, I can't make up stuff this stupid - it's real.

//ok, I "could" probably make up stuff this stupid - but this time I didn't have to//

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