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The OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Rolling Distribution Goes Mainstream

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I almost bought an Android phone. I hesitated, wondering whether it would be upgradeable to 2.2 or 2.3? I am not in the habit of changing phones even once a year. So, I got myself a phone that is, well, ‘just a phone’. Upon reflection, all I needed was the ability to receive calls and SMS messages and, rarely, make some calls. If I couldn’t upgrade the software versions, its value as a playground for experimenting with mobile applications was very limited.

Desktop distribution versions can be equally frustrating. For several years, I have felt that while version upgrades may be very useful for proprietary distributions, they are counter-productive for open source options.

Moving to Tumbleweed

So, what do you need to do to try it? The machine I was going to install Tumbleweed on was a Lenovo S10-3 netbook. I was going to use the Plasma Netbook Workspace, which is what I used with Arch Linux and Fedora on this system. You obviously do not need to stick to a netbook or the KDE desktop. However, you do need to start with an OpenSUSE 11.4 distribution. There was one distributed with LFY’s April 2011 issue.

rest here

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