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Not Your Average Linux Distribution: DOD's Flavor

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Linux

The Department of Defense (DOD) has released a unique Linux distribution designed to be a secure option for people, such as telecommuters, who need remote access to internal government and corporate networks from potentially insecure desktops.

Created by a collaboration between the DOD and the Air Force Research Laboratory, Lightweight Portable Security (LPS) can be booted from a CD or flash drive onto nearly any Intel-based PC or Mac, according to information posted on the project's website.

The idea behind the distribution is to give people a secure option for accessing firewall-protected networks and the Web from home or shared PCs or Macs, the military said.

Rest here




That's old news

Read about it first about two years ago. But there are better options out there. Read http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20110704. Not exactly flattering, and not that secure either, judging by quotation "The system doesn't feel particularly secure either, with the user always running as root, passwords stored in the open, Flash enabled by default and Firefox Sync installed. The encryption wizard is easy to use, but seems limited in the types of encryption it can handle." Say no more.

re: old news

Yeah, I know. That's why I didn't cover it when it first started circulating around. I wasn't even inspired to write about it myself.

But it kept growing and more and more sites kept writing about it, so I figured I'd throw one link up here. They did release an update.

Besides, I'm not so sure I'd trust anything this government released.

re: old news

"Besides, I'm not so sure I'd trust anything this government released." Cool

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