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Infamous Microsoft FUD Campaigns Against Linux

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Linux
Microsoft

From the buggy-yet-popular Windows 95 to the god-knows-what-it-is and upcoming Windows 8, Microsoft has come a long way. Unlike the 90’s, they aren’t just making computers, today they manufacture almost anything your tech-savvy mind can dream of. But after all these years, what hasn’t changed is the fact that Microsoft is still a company full of uptight nerds who think that attacking their competitors is what makes them no 1. Microsoft’s long war against Linux, Android and all things related to Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) is something that can’t be ignored anymore.

Here is a look at the history of Microsoft's infamous FUD (Fear, uncertainty and doubt) campaigns against Linux and FOSS:

Microsoft's first FUD

Microsoft initially had no big competitors. Everything was peachy in the rapidly-growing Gatesland. From office desktops to giant servers, Windows was having a somewhat faddish influence on the computer-curios crowd.

Rest here




Do we need counter-FUD against Microsoft?

The article seems to be as full of errors as any Microsoft FUD. Unix and BSD flavors were available on Intel microprocessors prior to Windows 95, as were MacIntosh 68000 processor and PowerPC computers. DOS and Windows 3.x clients were used on Novell Netware, IBM Minicomputer, and Unix networks well before Windows 95, and Windows networks with peer-to-peer networking were working under DOS 4/5/6.

Unfortunately, the only market share where Linux has been able to make inroads is the *nix market.

Huh?

"Unlike the 90’s, they aren’t just making computers"

Um... when did Microsoft EVER make a computer?

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